Blog for Zip line Attraction in the Smoky Mountains

Located in Pigeon Forge, TN and near Gatlinburg and Sevierville.

 

Historic Sites In The Smokies

By Ross Bodhi Ogle
Posted on January 27, 2015

Our zip lines in the Smokies may not be back up to full schedule yet, but we still have plenty of recommendations for places to go and things to do while you're in this neck of the woods. History buffs, especially, might be interested to know that there are lots of places within Great Smoky Mountains National Park alone that are of historical significance. Here are just a few to look for when you're in the park:

• John Oliver cabin – You'll find this one in the Cades Cove area of the park, and it's just a short walk off the one-way loop road. One of the oldest surviving structures in the Smokies, it was the homestead of early Cove settlers John and Lucretia Oliver, who built the cabin without pegs or nails. It stays anchored by gravity alone, and the cabin still stands today in its original location.

• Noah “Bud” Ogle Homestead – This cabin can be found along the Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail near Gatlinburg and includes a cabin, barn and working tub mill, all of which have been restored and preserved. The tub mill is one of the few left in existence and still grinds thanks to water from nearby LeConte Creek.

• Little Greenbrier School – This one-room schoolhouse operated for more than 50 years in the 1800s, and it did double duty as a Primitive Baptist Church. It's a moderate hike away from Little River Road, between Gatlinburg and Cades Cove.

• John Cable Mill and Mingus Mill – These are two of the four working mills remaining in the Smokies. Cable's Mill is on display at the Cades Cove Visitor Center (about halfway through the loop tour), and Mingus Mill is on the North Carolina side of the national park, about a mile from the Oconaluftee Visitor Center.

 

This content posted by Smoky Mountain Ziplines. Visit our home page, smokymountainziplines.com for more information on zipline adventures in the Smoky Mountains.

Powered by StoneOakPress