Blog for Zip line Attraction in the Smoky Mountains

Located in Pigeon Forge, TN and near Gatlinburg and Sevierville.

 

Dollywood Roller Coaster Preview - Part Two

By Ross Bodhi Ogle
Posted on April 12, 2022

If you read our blog post from last week, you saw part one of our overview of all the roller coasters at Dollywood theme park. In that installment, we introduced you to Blazing Fury, FireChaser Express, Lightning Rod and Mystery Mine. Today, we're going to wrap up Dollywood Coaster 101 with thumbnail descriptions of five more roller coasters. Hopefully, next time you visit the park, you'll know exactly which rides are right for you. And happy coasting!

Tennessee Tornado

This was the roller coaster that helped Dollywood start upping its coaster game back in the 1990s. It replaced the former Thunder Express Coaster, making it only the second roller coaster at Dollywood for several years. This triple spiral-looping coaster is a smooth ride on a steel track. You climb steadily up to the first drop, a 128-foot plunge into a dark mountain passage at close to 70 miles per hour. From there, you hold on tight through several inversions and twisty loops, in addition to the usual peaks and valleys and hairpin turns. You'll find Tennessee Tornado in the Craftsman's Valley section of the park, and you have to be at least 48 inches tall to ride.

Thunderhead

This vintage-style wooden coaster is a favorite among roller coaster enthusiasts who visit the park just for the thrill rides. The massive coaster stands tall among the surrounding trees and hills, and highlights include an initial 100-foot drop and top speeds of 55 miles per hour. But it's not the speed that passengers remember as much as the rollicking, jostling, bone shaking experience this ride delivers. There's also lots of good airtime on the peaks and drops, and it's one of the longer lasting coasters at Dollywood. Thunderhead is located in the Timber Canyon area, and passengers must be at least 48 inches tall to ride.

Whistle Punk Chaser

We're not sure where the name comes from, but you parents will want to know that this coaster was designed to be a tame, family-style ride. Passengers must be at least 36 inches tall, and those shorter than 42 inches must be accompanied by someone age 16 or older. This junior coaster still has its share of twists and turns and is a good intermediate experience for younger guests who may like the ups and downs but aren't yet tall enough to ride the other rides.

Wild Eagle

Here's another smooth, steel-track ride that bills itself as America's first wing coaster. That means instead of passengers sitting directly over the track, they sit out to either side of it, essentially on eagles' wings. Nothing but air above and below! Perched 21 stories above ground level, Wild Eagle takes riders on a unique experience designed to feel like soaring high above the Smokies. You must be at least 50 inches tall to ride Wild Eagle and no taller than 78 inches. You'll find this coaster in the Wilderness Pass area of Dollywood.

Dragonflier

Making its debut in 2019 as Dollywood's newest coaster, Dragonflier mimics the flight of a Smoky Mountain dragonfly as it speeds through the terrain in a twisting, unpredictable path. Between the wind in your face and the thrill of flying, it's an exhilarating ride for anyone in the family who's at least 39 inches tall. The maximum height is 81 inches. Located in Wildwood Grove, Dragonflier was designed to be a family ride and inclusive of younger kids. There are, however, some moments that rival what you might feel on a legit thrill ride.

And speaking of having the wind in your face and the thrill of flying, those are things you can also enjoy at Smoky Mountain Ziplines. For anyone planning to do any zip lining in Tennessee this year, you won't find a location that offers a more exciting outdoor Smoky Mountain adventure.

 

This content posted by Smoky Mountain Ziplines. Visit our home page, smokymountainziplines.com for more information on zipline adventures in the Smoky Mountains.

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